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Departure Of The Lord Nelson

Departure of the Lord Nelson

LORD NELSON TO SET DEPART SOUTH AFRICA – 11:00am

 

The Master of Lord Nelson has confirmed that he is intending to sail from Cape Town (V&A Waterfront) at 11am on Sunday.   Lord Nelson’s destination is Durban, and she will then leave South Africa to sail up to India.  Lets give them a great RCYC send-off.

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A number of South African crew members are joining the 55-m tall ship Lord Nelson at the V&A Waterfront to set sail on a week-long voyage as part of the Norton Rose Sail the World Challenge on Wednesday afternoon. The ship will return to Cape Town on 12 February.

The South African voyage crew members joining today include:???

Tetraplegic Capetonian Russell Vollmer, 55, who was the first South African to take part in the sailing events at the Paralympic Games at Sydney 2000 and is a former commodore of the Royal Cape Yacht Club. Vollmer, who has lived as a quadriplegic since the age of 19, became disabled when he broke his neck in a diving accident in 1976 while serving with the South African Navy. Vollmer???s participation s sponsored by international legal practice, Norton Rose.

 

Versha Rowjee, 41, who has congenital spina bifida and uses a wheelchair. Originally from Mokopane in Limpopo, Rowjee now lives in Johannesburg where she works as an accountant. The experience will be the latest of Rowjee’s personal challenges, which to date have included quad biking and scuba diving.

David Kapelus, 49, director at Norton Rose South Africa, who is sailing on Lord Nelson on the seven-day voyage out of Cape Town. Kapelus has used a wheelchair since a diving accident when he was 18 years old in 1983. “I’m completely excited – it’s going to be a fantastic experience. These opportunities don’t come around often, if ever,” Kapelus said.

Capetonian Brandon Davids, 23, who is profoundly deaf and a student of the Whisper Boatbuilding Community Project, a fiberglass laminating skills development programme for the deaf. The charity, based in the Epping area, is one of the members of SASLA (South African Sail Training for Life Skills Association). Davids joined Whisper in 2011 as one of the charity’s first 15 students.

 

BACKGROUND:Lord Nelson was built in the UK and first set sail in 1986. The bespoke features on board, including hearing loops, wheelchair lifts, integrated Braille instructions and speaking compasses, allow a disabled sailor to contribute to the voyage just as much as an able-bodied crew member and their interdependence creates a community aboard the ship for the duration of the voyage ??? a bond which remains long after the crew is back on dry land.

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30 January 2013

 

Unique tall ship sailed by disabled and able-bodied crew heads for South Africa on ground breaking round the world voyage!!!

The 55-metre square rigger, Lord Nelson, is expected to arrive in Cape Town from Rio de Janeiro this weekend at the end of the second transatlantic leg of the ground breaking Norton Rose Sail the World Challenge. The voyage has been organised by UK-based charity, the Jubilee Sailing Trust and is supported by international legal practice Norton Rose, which has five of its 42 offices in Africa.

The ship is designed to enable physically disabled and able-bodied crew to sail alongside each other as equals. A number of South Africans, both with and without disabilities, will join the Lord Nelson crew in Cape Town on 6 February for a seven-day coastal voyage, while others will embark on 16 February for the passage from Cape Town to Durban.

One of the South Africans taking part is 41-year-old Versha Rowjee, who has congenital spina bifida and uses a wheelchair.Originally from Mokopane in Limpopo, Rowjee now lives in Johannesburg where she works as an accountant. She will join the crew of Lord Nelson for the week-long voyage out of Cape Town.

The experience will be the latest of Rowjee’s personal challenges, which to date have included quad biking and scuba diving.

“I’m looking forward to an amazing adventure, being involved in the activities as part of the crew and the opportunity of my life,” Rowjee said.

“I’m very excited. I can’t wait and I have to consciously stop myself from talking to everyone about it all the time,” she added.

Another South African taking part is 52-year-old Mandy Latimore from Johannesburg, who has used a wheelchair following a climbing accident.

“The thing I’m looking forward to the most is being on the highest point possible on Lord Nelson,??? the independent consultant within the disability sector, said.

Latimore, who has sailed on smaller boats in the past admits, she is an ???adrenaline junkie??? and has previously wing walked. “I can’t wait to join the ship. I’m counting the sleeps,” she added.

Lord Nelsonis an ambassador for equality and inclusion wherever she sails, and the Norton Rose Sail the World Challenge is set to transform perceptions of what disabled and able-bodied people can achieve together, both in South Africa and around the world.

Over the course of 23 months, Lord Nelson will make four Equator crossings, log 50,000 nautical miles, and visit 30 countries on seven continents. The journey is unique due to the people who make up the “voyage crew” on board: all of them have stepped out of their everyday lives to participate, all of them refusing to be limited by disability or self-imposed comfort zones to become part of a round the world crew.

“When the 35-strong crew of the Lord Nelson arrives in Cape Town this weekend at the end of the second transatlantic passage of the Norton Rose Sail the World Challenge they will have achieved something remarkable of which they can all be justly proud. With disabled crew sailing alongside their able bodied counterparts as equals as they make their first landfall in Africa on the 23-month circumnavigation, each and every one of them is challenging perceptions of disability and that is what the Jubilee Sailing Trust and this ground breaking, round the world voyage is all about,” Alex Lochrane, CEO, Jubilee Sailing Trust, said.

“The Jubilee Sailing Trust’s mission is about inclusion, community and teamwork and, without this, Lord Nelson would never be able to make this amazing ocean journey,” Lochrane added.

Norton Rose is the title sponsor of this unique round-the-world voyage, and promoting their support under the banner of: “All abilities. All aboard.” The practice has one of the largest legal footprints in Africa and operates from five offices in Johannesburg, Cape Town, Durban, Dar es Salaam and Casablanca, with experience in more than 40 African countries.Norton Rose employees are looking forward to welcoming Lord Nelson and her crew to their shores when she docks in Cape Town and Durban, and a number of Norton Rose employees will sail on the ship on the voyages within South Africa.

 

“We are delighted to be involved and I am especially pleased about the positive responses our local participation has elicited in our offices, nationally and also internationally. This project is another excellent opportunity for us to live our principles of quality, unity and integrity,” Rob Otty, managing director of Norton Rose South Africa said.

After setting sail from Southampton in the UK on Sunday 21 October, buoyed by the resounding success of the London 2012 Paralympic Games, the crew of Lord Nelson arrived in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on 9 December following the first of three transatlantic legs in the historic circumnavigation.

A team of disabled and non-disabled sailors, led by a team of eight professional “permanent crew”, set sail from Rio on 11 January on the 3,455-mile passage to Cape Town via Tristan da Cunha, a group of remote volcanic islands in the South Atlantic.

Lord Nelsonwas built in the UK and first set sail in 1986. The bespoke features on board, including hearing loops, wheelchair lifts, integrated Braille instructions and speaking compasses, allow a disabled sailor to contribute to the voyage just as much as an able-bodied crew member and their interdependence creates a community aboard the ship for the duration of the voyage ??? a bond which remains long after the crew is back on dry land.

Berths are still available to sail on board the Lord Nelson during her inaugural visit to South Africa. No previous sailing experience is required and a wide range of physical disabilities can be accommodated. For more information, visit www.jst.org.ukor email .

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Lord Nelson Brochure

The Barque Lord Nelson is due to arrive in Cape Town on 3rd February.

Over the next two years, Lord Nelson will sail four times across the Equator, covering 50,000 miles, seven continents and 30 countries. Lord Nelson – built and operated by the Jubilee Sailing Trust – is one of only two tall ships in the world equipped to sail with a mixed crew of disabled and able-bodied sailors.

Lord Nelson is a square-rigged, three-masted, 55-metre barque. Her equipment includes hoists to enable crew members in wheelchairs to be lifted up the rigging. She is regularly crewed by people with cerebral palsy, people who are blind and people who have suffered amputations and spinal injuries. Everyone on board plays a role in sailing the tall ship and the Jubilee Sailing Trust is experienced in showing all crew members the full extent of what they are capable of on board the ship, requiring and enabling the crew to bond and work as an integrated team for the duration of each voyage.

 

 

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