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Governors Cup – UPDATE 06 JAN 2013

Positions as at 0900 – 06 January 2013

There are now 3 yachts reporting less the 50nm to the finish line at 0900 CAT this morning, 1st in should be the Norwegians on Maggie followed by either Patches or Tico-Tico.Ocean Cloud (92nm) who’s tracker has not pinged since the 2nd of January should be at the Island later tonight with Silver Cloud (122nm) and Black Cat (148nm) probably crossing the finish line in the early hours of Monday morning.

What is really impressive is that Black Cat who detoured to Luderitz, and only resumed racing on Sunday 30th December 2012 will have covered the 1332nm from Luderitz to St. Helena in 8 days averaging a very respectable 167nm per day.

Banjo the Line Honours winner averaged 166nm per day from Simon’s Town and the Governor’s Cup winner Reaction managed a 144nm average 24hour pace for the race. Perhaps the Crew from Black Cat will be the first entrant into the next Governor’s Cup because I’m certain they, like Tinus Groenewald from Reaction, will have some unfinished business to avenge in 2014.

Weather out on the approaches to St. Helena Island: Wind SE 11 -18knts, Still pretty overcast with 8/8ths cloud cover and waves of between 1 – 1.5M – John Lesli

LATEST RESULTS CAN BE FOUND HERE

PHOTO GALLERY


Banjo takes line honours

Farrier trimaran arrives in St Helena after 1,750-mile blast from South Africa

Wednesday 2 January, 2013 Banjo Kevin Webb’s Farrier F9AX trimaran, co-skippered by Sarel van der Merwe, crossed the finish line of the 1,750-mile Governor’s Cup Race at17:35:24 on Tuesday 1 January.

Webb and van der Merwe arrived in Jamestown, St Helena to a hero’s welcome after a 10-day downwind blast from the South African port of Simon’s Town. The team aboard this superfast trimaran sailed a good, tactical race and were unstoppable.As they stepped ashore Team Banjo were surprisingly chirpy but Webb did admit to feeling content to be back on shore. We are feeling relieved and happy. We tried hard, had a great sail. We made a couple of tactical errors but our revised strategy paid off.

Although the conditions were light at times, particularly in the early part of the race, most experienced classic Atlantic conditions at some point. For Webb and van der Merwe, there was one particular day that really stood out. We had a run of 225 miles over a 24-hour period with the highlight being screaming down waves at 18kts. We also had a few bad points too, which included experiencing really dark nights and falling into massive holes in the sea.

Eyes are now focussed on the second boat to arrive in St Helena. As the situations currently stands, Sandpiper 2 Abri Erasmus/Paul Tanner’s Simonis Voogd 42ft catamaran is due to cross the finish line sometime today. However, at 0800 (UTC) she had just less than 90 miles to go and with lighter winds expected, it could be a late evening finish.

It will be interesting to see what happens with the Racing Monohull fleet as the battle for overall handicap honours continues. Although Thinus Groenewald’s Royal Cape One-Design Reaction is still in an overall favourable position on handicap, 12 miles ahead of Indaba (John Levin’s Stadt 34), she is currently making just 4.5kts, while Indaba is speeding along at 7.5kts to the east of the rhumb line. For Indaba to be in with a chance of winning overall on handicap in this late stage of the race however, she needs to overtake Reaction and finish far enough ahead to still win when handicap is applied.

In the Rally Monohull fleet Ivan Flodgren and the Swedish team aboard their Hallberg Rassey Rasmus 35  Kuheli have maintained the overnight lead ahead of JML Rotary Scout, a Tosca 39. The Swedes took the initial fleet lead in the early part of the race but JML Rotary Scout, co-skippered by Peter Bosch and Stephen Jennings and crewed by a group of Scouts from Cape Town and St Helena aged between 16-18 years old, took a turn at the front of the fleet two days ago, and are keen to repeat this performance in the next 24-hours.

In third place in this fleet, and sailing consistently well are the Fisher family (Luke, and Monica, together with their two children Todd, 14, and Amy, 13) aboard Bryana, a Dudley Dix 38ft steel-hulled, home-completed yacht. As well as maintaining third in fleet, they are currently leading the race for the Family trophy.

Kevin Ward’s Elan Impression 434, Canace, sponsored by Nampak Bevcan’s CAN DO!, crewed by a team of five between the ages of 52 and 70, also appears to be holding a good position and is now in fourth place in the fleet with 199 miles to go to the finish. Ward chatting from the yacht at 0800 (UTC) this morning said: We are having an exciting race because we now have Compromise, the cat, just ahead of us. At the moment the wind is blowing a good south-easterly 25kts so we are blasting along. We are hoping it won’t drop because this is the sort of wind that suits us perfectly. We are planning to reach the finish line at about midday tomorrow, if the wind continues. In these conditions we are sailing goose-winged, with the genoa poled-out rather than flying the spinnaker because we find this setup makes it a lot easier.

More details on the Governor’s Cup Yacht Race can be found at www.governorscup.co.za; or by visiting the Governor’s Cup Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/#!/Governorscup2012?notif_t=fbpage_fan_invite.

Issued by Sue Pelling in conjunction with ADPR.

Please credit images: Photography by SHBC.

Ray of Light Safely in Lamberts Bay for New Year

Happy New Year everyone!

Ray of Light entered Lamberts Bay at around 0630 yesterday. As we approached the harbour in the rising sun we were completely blind. Fortunately we had local expert Ron Selly on the line. He guided us through the reefs and to a safe anchorage inside the breakwater. Heidi’s parents Pieter and Helga von Bredow had scouted out the place for us during the night and were a very welcome sight at the end of the breakwater.

At 0715 on 31 December I turned off the Yanmar. It had not missed a beat since being fired up in Luderitz at 2100 on 27 December, 82 hours of continuous operation. We managed our diesel well, with the gauge around 3/4. We were very relieved to have completed the nearly 500 mile beat against wind and current from Luderitz to Lamberts Bay. When leaving Luderitz we had hoped to sail the shortest distance. However motoring straight into the wind was not an option. To make the best of the SE winds that veered to S we sailed on port out to sea and tacked back on starboard to Lamberts. In doing so we reduced the effective tacking angle to 60 – 70 degrees.

Ray of Light

We have two light aluminium fortress anchors. They claim to be the best anchors in the world. The last 24 hours has seen them properly tested as the very strong southerly winds arrived. They have passed with flying colours.

Iain, Greg, Richard and Sophie met us for breakfast in Lamberts Bay. Iain volunteered to spend new years eve on Ray of Light doing anchor watch, enabling Heidi, Sean and I to spend the evening with Pieter and Helga in Langebaan. Iain reports that new years was a little scary as parachute flares set off from the shore were landing close to the boat, still burning. He even took the precaution of having a fire extinguisher on deck!

Today we return to the boat to plan the final leg of our journey back to Cape Town. Looks like we’ll get a weather window sometime on the 2nd or 3rd. For the last leg the boat will be crewed by Michael, Iain and Sophie. Heidi and Sean get a welcome break from upwind sailing and sea sickness.

THE GOVERNOR’S CUP

The battle for overall handicap honours in the Racing Monohull fleet fought by RCYC’s Indaba and Reaction…..

The battle for line honours intensifies

Banjo’s lead threatened by Sandpiper 2

Sunday 30 December, 2012 – As the 18-strong Governor’s Cup fleet make its final approach to St Helena on this 1,750-mile race from Simon’s Town, South Africa, competition is really starting to intensify.

The overall line honours trophy is still very much up for grabs with Banjo – Kevin Webb’s Farrier F9AX trimaran – now threatened by Sandpiper 2 – Abri Erasmus/Paul Tanner’s Simonis Voogd 42ft catamaran. Until two days ago Banjo had established a solid lead, but the Gordon’s Bay Yacht Club team on Sandpiper 2, has sailed well over the last couple of days and is now set to launch a challenge.

The current leader of the Multihull class, on handicap, is Robert Newman’s Du Toit catamaran – Compromise.

Paul Tanner – skipper of Sandpiper 2 – says that Banjo is just 40 miles to starboard so the final part of the race is going to be tough. Sandpiper 2 is currently in a south-easterly breeze. We are in direct competition with Banjo at the moment so we are reluctant to give too much away. However, we can report it is very hot at 30 degrees C. We have 20 per cent cloud cover, one and a half metres of swell, and a cross chop against main swell makes it a bit uncomfortable. All going well and our watch system is really working well between six of us. We each do a two-hour stint on the helm, two hours as stand by during daylight hours, and one and a half hours at night in each role, that relates to four hours on, and eight hours off in daylight. We have not seen another boat for five days, so we are looking forward to closing in soon.

The battle for overall handicap honours in the Racing Monohull fleet, is equally intense between John Levin’s Stadt 34 Indaba, and Thinus Groenewald’s Royal Cape One-Design – Reaction. The current situation shows that either of these two are in with a chance of an overall Governor’s Cup win but it will depend on what conditions are thrown at the fleet as it approaches St Helena.

Another team who could have been in with a chance of an overall Governor’s Cup win had they not elected to race within the Rally Mononhull fleet (which doesn’t qualify for the overall trophy) is False Bay Yacht Club members aboard JML Rotary Scout, a Tosca 39. This team co skippered by Peter Bosch and Mark Jennings and crewed by a group of Scouts from Cape Town and St Helena aged between 16-18 years old, has sailed exceptionally well and have managed to overtake Ivan Flodgren and the Swedish team, aboard their Hallberg Rassey Rasmus 35 – Kuheli – who have led the Rally Monohull division since the start.

The Fisher family aboard Bryana, a Dudley Dix 38ft steel-hulled, home-completed yacht, is currently leading the race for the Family trophy and in third place overall in the Rally Monohull fleet. Luke (52) and Monica (46) together with their two children – Todd (14) and Amy (13) are enjoying a fun Christmas break. Before they left Simon’s Town at the start, they said that spending Christmas together on the ocean means a lot to them. It will be the first time we have crossed an ocean together and none of us have ever been to St Helena before, so it will be a big adventure all round.

Elsewhere, Adrian Pearson/Dave Immelman’s Didi 38 – Black Cat – which suffered power failure and had to make a detour for repair for repairs, has now left Luderitz on the African coast, and is back on course again towards St Helena.

RMS St Helena – one of the world’s last operating mail ships is now in St Helena awaiting the first arrivals. The ship, which shadowed the fleet all the way from Simon’s Town with family and friends of those in the race on board, will transport many of the competing yachts back to Simon’s Town once the race is over. Billy Leisegang, the principal race officer, who made the voyage on the ship, commented from St Helena this morning.

There is a tremendous atmosphere on the island at the moment. Everyone is so excited about the arrival of the yachts. At this stage we are not exactly sure of the ETA of the first finishers but we are guessing the first boats will arrive late on 1 January or early morning on 2 January. The good news is, there is a strong wind here so it’s a good sign it will be a very fast finish, and they may even arrive sooner than predicted.”

More details on the Governor’s Cup Yacht Race can be found at www.governorscup.co.za; or by visiting the Governor’s Cup Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/#!/Governorscup2012?notif_t=fbpage_fan_invite.

Issued by Sue Pelling in conjunction with ADPR.

Please credit images: Jan Theron.

ENDS

Notes to editors

The Governor’s Cup Race is a downwind 1,700 nautical mile ocean yacht race organised by False Bay Yacht Club, www.fbyc.co.za, and is now claimed to be an entry on many sailor’s bucket list. First held in 1996, the Governor’s Cup Race is a bi-annual event starting from False Bay Yacht Club in the quaint naval town of Simon’s Town, South Africa finishing in Jamestown, St Helena. For further details on the race including race documents, visit http://www.governorscup.co.za.

This year the race is being supported for the first time by Enterprise St Helena, which promotes the growth of economy of St Helena through the development of existing businesses and the promotion of the island to new investors and developers. With the opening of the island’s airport due by late 2015, it is anticipated that tourism, and marine tourism in particular, will be a key economic driver for the island and its community. For further details visit www.investinsthelena.biz.

For further details on St Helena Island, visit www.sthelenatourism.com.

The Governor’s Cup race is proud to be supported by Andrew Weir Shipping SA (Pty) Ltd www.aws.co.ukand RMS St Helena  www.rms-st-helena.com.

For further media information please contact Sue Pelling: .

Saturday 22nd December 19 yachts will set off for St Helena Island. Six of these yachts are from Royal Cape.

They are: African Renaissance

  • Black Cat
  • Ielool
  • Indaba
  • Ray of Light
  • Reaction

The Governor’s Cup is an approximately 1700 mile yacht race starting from False Bay Yacht Club in Simon’s Town, South Africa, to James Bay on St. Helena Island. The yachts should all have arrived by 8th January. The first Govenors Cup was raced in 1996 with fifteen entries.

For all race updates please see the Governors Cup Website: http://www.governorscup.co.za/

We thought you may be interested in this five minute interview with Billy Leisegang, General Manager of False Bay Yacht Club and Principal Race Officer. Here Billy discusses what has been involved in organising the race, who takes part, the most challenging parts of the race, what happens on St Helena when the race has finished and, how the winners are decided.

If you have any further questions regarding the race, please do not hesitate to contact us,   / or call 01460 241 641.

5 Minutes With…
Billy Leisegang, General Manager, False Bay Yacht Club

The Governor’s Cup Yacht Race is a downwind 1,750 nautical mile ocean yacht race and is claimed to be an entry on many sailors’bucket list. First held in 1996, the Governor’s Cup Race is a bi-annual event starting from False Bay Yacht Club in the quaint naval town of Simon’s Town, South Africa, finishing in Jamestown, St Helena – one of the most remote destinations in the world and currently only accessible by one of the last operating Royal Mail Ships, the RMS St Helena.

We take five minutes to catch up with Billy Leisegang, Principal Race Officer

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